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This tutorial discusses how to interface traditional, Windows-hosted PowerBuilder 32-bit and 64-bit applications with the Windows Application Programming Interface (API), also known as the WinAPI. Much of the information presented here also applies to interfacing with DLL’s created in-house or by third-party vendors, because the interface mechanism in PB is the same. The focus, however, will be on interfacing to the WinAPI.

The tutorial is presented in four parts. Part one covers External Function Declarations in PB and explores issues related to interfacing with the WinAPI. The second part examines the calling conventions in 64-bit Windows and important differences between the 32-bit and 64-bit environments. Part three looks at several factors that can affect the interfacing of PB applications with the WinAPI, such as null values, PB datatypes not supported by Windows, the PB Any datatype, unbounded arrays, nested structures and arrays of nested structures. The tutorial concludes in part four beginning with the description of an available free PB sample application and non-visual object that can dynamically determine the memory size and layout of a structure in either 32-bit or 64-bit environments. Part four also contains a list of coding tips & techniques to help you develop PB applications that interface with the WinAPI, and mapping tables to assist in the translation between many common WinAPI datatypes and the standard PB datatypes.

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This tutorial is an update to the 2019 tutorial. If you have zero experience with the UI Theme feature, please first follow our Quick Start tutorial. If you are ready to gain a comprehensive understanding of this feature and dive deeper into UI Theme settings, then please proceed with this updated tutorial.

Starting from PowerBuilder 2019, Appeon added the UI theme feature to PowerBuilder so that developers can codelessly control how commonly-used controls and objects render during application runtime.

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 En este vídeo veremos los requisitos de hardware para instalar PowerBuilder 2019 R2, como se descarga la versión trial y como es el proceso de instalación.

 

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This quick start tutorial walks you through the 3 simple steps to apply the UI Theme to your PowerBuilder application. For more advanced techniques, such as how to define a customized theme and how to define theme settings for selected objects/controls, you may refer to the advanced tutorial: https://community.appeon.com/index.php/articles-blogs/tutorials-articles/2-powerbuilder/301-applying-a-new-ui-theme-to-your-application-2.

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In PowerBuilder 2019, 3 new UI themes are provided to control how PowerBuilder’s commonly-used controls render in runtime applications. These new UI themes adopt a “Windows 10” style to enhance the appearances of applications. For detailed description of the themes, see Understanding system themes and Details on the theme settings and their effects.

You can directly control whether an application applies a new UI theme, or provide users with the ability to select a preferred theme by themselves. For details, see Applying a theme.

It is possible for you to modify a system theme through changing the theme template files, or to copy a system theme to create a custom theme. This way, you can further tune the color settings in the theme to your personal preference. For details, see Creating a custom theme.

You may want to use the UI theme settings together with the PowerBuilder IDE settings and scripting techniques to achieve optimum UI effects. For samples on how to start the work, see Several useful techniques to further adjust your user interface.

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In a previous blog post I ran through a example of how to use the new command line compiler feature of PowerBuilder 2017 to perform continuous integration using Jenkins and a Git repository.  One of the "next steps" I referenced in the close of that post was the creation of a plug-in for Jenkins that would make creating the build steps for the project much simpler.

Well, I've created such a plugin.  Or more specifically what I did was take the existing MSBuild plugin and customize it to create a number of plugins to do PowerBuilder compiles instead.

In this post I'm going to look at how we can use those plugins, plus some additional changes I've made to the project in Jenkins to make better use of the capability of Jenkins and other Jenkin plugins.