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This tutorial has discussed how to interface traditional, Windows-hosted PowerBuilder 32-bit and 64-bit applications with the Windows Application Programming Interface (API), also known as the WinAPI. In the first three parts, the groundwork was laid to make you more knowledgeable and comfortable coding External Function Declarations (EFD's) and understanding the nuances of how information is exchanged between PB and Windows API functions. Part four contains a list of coding tips and techniques and mapping tables to help you with the translation between many common WinAPI datatypes and the standard PB datatypes. It also describes a free PB sample application and non-visual user object that can dynamically determine the memory size and layout of a structure in either 32-bit or 64-bit environments.

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From Windows to Linux 

Did you know that Powerbuilder 2019 could run on Linux ?

Since Powerbuilder 2019 is now in 64 bit, it is now a lot easier to run on Linux using wine64

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For many PowerBuilder users who are using older versions of PowerBuilder with TFS and are wondering whether the latest PowerBuilder 2019 R2 would work with the latest Azure DevOps Server 2019, this article shows how you could achieve that.

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This tutorial discusses how to interface traditional, Windows-hosted PowerBuilder 32-bit and 64-bit applications with the Windows Application Programming Interface (API), also known as the WinAPI. Much of the information presented here also applies to interfacing with DLL’s created in-house or by third-party vendors, because the interface mechanism in PB is the same. The focus, however, will be on interfacing to the WinAPI.

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This tutorial discusses how to interface traditional, Windows-hosted PowerBuilder 32-bit and 64-bit applications with the Windows Application Programming Interface (API), also known as the WinAPI. Much of the information presented here also applies to interfacing with DLL’s created in-house or by third-party vendors, because the interface mechanism in PB is the same. The focus, however, will be on interfacing to the WinAPI.

User Rating: 5 / 5

Star ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar Active

This tutorial discusses how to interface traditional, Windows-hosted PowerBuilder 32-bit and 64-bit applications with the Windows Application Programming Interface (API), also known as the WinAPI. Much of the information presented here also applies to interfacing with DLL’s created in-house or by third-party vendors, because the interface mechanism in PB is the same. The focus, however, will be on interfacing to the WinAPI.

The tutorial is presented in four parts. Part one covers External Function Declarations in PB and explores issues related to interfacing with the WinAPI. The second part examines the calling conventions in 64-bit Windows and important differences between the 32-bit and 64-bit environments. Part three looks at several factors that can affect the interfacing of PB applications with the WinAPI, such as null values, PB datatypes not supported by Windows, the PB Any datatype, unbounded arrays, nested structures and arrays of nested structures. The tutorial concludes in part four beginning with the description of an available free PB sample application and non-visual object that can dynamically determine the memory size and layout of a structure in either 32-bit or 64-bit environments. Part four also contains a list of coding tips & techniques to help you develop PB applications that interface with the WinAPI, and mapping tables to assist in the translation between many common WinAPI datatypes and the standard PB datatypes.